‘12 Years a Slave’ Vocalist to Perform at Palace

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Featured Vocalist from ‘12 Years a Slave’ to Perform at Palace on Feb. 20
Tyree Highlights Black History Month with ‘New York and the 19th-Century Slavery Question’ 

NEW BERN, NC – Feb. 20, 2014

Tami Tyree, an actress, historian, musicologist, and featured vocalist in the movie “12 Years a Slave,” will help Tryon Palace honor Black History Month with a musical lecture entitled “New York and the 19th-Century Slavery Question.” Hosted by Tryon Palace’s monthly African American Lecture Series, this free event will be held at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 20, in Cullman Performance Hall. 

Tyree explains that while citizens on both sides of the Mason-Dixon Line were arguing the slavery question, slaves were artfully making their own statements. Preserved through oral testimonies, these stories from the hearts and minds of those in bondage were fused with melody and poetic verse to form the earliest religious folk songs. Known today as spirituals, these moving, historical songs from the past are described by Tyree as the freedom cry of enslaved African Americans. 

Tyree lives and breathes these first songs of resistance. Noted for her concise and passionate delivery of African American history in song, she will deliver spiritual masterpieces and explain the slavery situation as it appeared in 19th-century America. As a native New Yorker, she will highlight occurrences with an emphasis on the Empire State as a geographical, moral, and civil conduit for the abolition of slavery. Special attention will also be given to her role in the movie “12 Years a Slave” (2013 Golden Globe winner for Best Picture). The lecture is also based upon her series of articles inspired by the movie and the historical and current social issues surrounding it. The publication Reflections on “12 Years a Slave” will be available for purchase. 

The Tryon Palace African American Lecture Series offers a new program on the third Thursday of each month. All performances begin at 7 p.m. in Cullman Performance Hall and are free, thanks to a generous donation from the Harold H. Bate Foundation. Special hearing devices are available if needed. Contact Tryon Palace 48 hours in advance of the performance to make arrangements. 

For additional information about “New York and the 19th-Century Slavery Question,” and other programs at Tryon Palace, please call (252) 639-3500. Information is also available at www.tryonpalace.org.

Tryon Palace Media Contact
Craig Ramey
Marketing and Communications, Manager
Phone: (252) 639-3511
E-mail: cramey@tryonpalace.org
Web: www.tryonpalace.org

About Tryon Palace
Tryon Palace, located in New Bern, NC, is part of the Office of Archives and History, an agency of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. Tryon Palace is one of North Carolina’s most significant historic sites. It is the home of the Governor’s Palace, North Carolina’s first colonial and first state capitol, and includes historic buildings, gardens and the North Carolina History Center, which revolutionizes the visitor experience through use of the latest interactive  technology. The History Center includes galleries, a performance hall, the museum store and a waterfront café. Tryon Palace’s mission is to engage present and future generations in the history of North Carolina from early settlement in 1710, the development of statehood and into the mid-twentieth century. It is dedicated to collecting, interpreting and preserving objects, buildings, landscapes and events that enrich understanding of the making of our state and nation.
Tickets and visitor information are available at Tryon Palace, 529 S. Front St., New Bern. For directions and further information about special events, programs or group tours, employment and more, visit our web site: www.tryonpalace.org or phone (800) 767-1560 or (252) 639-3500.
 
About the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources
The N.C. Department of Cultural Resources (NCDCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state’s cultural resources to build the social, cultural and economic future of North Carolina. Led by Secretary Susan Kluttz, NCDCR’s mission is to enrich lives and communities by creating opportunities to experience excellence in the arts, history and libraries in North Carolina that will spark creativity, stimulate learning, preserve the state’s history and promote the creative economy. NCDCR was the first state organization in the nation to include all agencies for arts and culture under one umbrella.

Through arts efforts led by the N.C. Arts Council, the N.C. Symphony and the N.C. Museum of Art, NCDCR offers the opportunity for enriching arts education for young and old alike and spurring the economic stimulus engine for our state’s communities. NCDCR’s Divisions of State Archives, Historical Resources, State Historic Sites and State History Museums preserve, document and interpret North Carolina’s rich cultural heritage to offer experiences of learning and reflection. NCDCR’s State Library of North Carolina is the principal library of state government and builds the capacity of all libraries in our state to develop and to offer access to educational resources through traditional and online collections including genealogy and resources for the blind and physically handicapped.

NCDCR annually serves more than 19 million people through its 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, the nation’s first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the N.C. Arts Council and the State Archives. NCDCR champions our state’s creative industry that accounts for more than 300,000 jobs and generates nearly $18.5 billion in revenues. For more information, please call (919) 807-7300 or visit www.ncdcr.gov.

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