2nd Annual Juneteenth Celebration

Thursday, June 20, 2019 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm

On Thursday, June 20, join us for the 2nd Annual Juneteenth Celebration at Tryon Palace with guest speaker, Dr. David Dennard

Program Schedule:

  • 7:00 p.m.: Present Flag, National Anthem (Lift Every Voice)
  • 7:10 p.m.: Youth Image Theater Performance - PACE
  • 7:20 p.m.: Youth-Performed Poetry - Y.E.L.L
  • 7:30 p.m.: Lecture, Dr. David Dennard
  • 8:15 p.m.: Q&A
  • 8:30 p.m.: Reception

About Juneteenth: 

Juneteenth was the oldest known observance of the ending of slavery in the United States. According to historical records, the celebration began on June 19, 1865, the day Major General Gordon Granger of the Union Army rode into Galveston, Texas in final execution of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Issued by President Abraham Lincoln on September 22, 1862, the Emancipation Proclamation stated, among other things, "That on the 1st day of January, A.D., 1863, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State the people whereof shall they be in rebellion against the United States shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free..."

In Texas, Granger's announcement was met with great celebration among the population of enslaved Africans. According to one account, "On the evening of June 19, 1865, thousands flooded the streets of Galveston, rejoicing in their newly announced freedom. The sweet smell of barbecue smoke filled the air. Dancing feet pounded the dirt roads and harmonic voices sung spirituals. This was the day, Juneteenth, that would forever commemorate African American freedom."

Juneteenth celebrations today commemorate that memorable day in 1865 Texas and emphasize the achievement of African Americans. Marked by community celebrations, guest speakers, picnics and family gatherings, it is a time for reflection and rejoicing, for self-assessment and planning and future.

"The celebration of Juneteenth is not only a showcase event of the African American community's positive contributions to the American way of life, but it also makes a statement for all Americans that the United States is truly the 'Land of the Free'," says Reginald D. Greene.

"Juneteenth is an expression and extension of American freedom and, like the Fourth of July, a time for all Americans to celebrate our independence, human rights, civil rights and freedom."


About Dr. Dennard:

Dr. David C. Dennard specializes in the social and cultural history of the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  He holds a BS. from Fort Valley State College, an M.A. from Atlanta University, and a Ph.D. from Northwestern University.  As former director of the Institute for Historical and Cultural Research, and as a current member of the North Carolina Historical Commission, he has worked broadly with museums and historic sites in North Carolina and is affiliated with several current boards and organizations.  In 2001, Governor Michael Easley appointed Dennard to the Historic Bath Commission; Governor Beverly Perdue appointed him to the NC Historical Commission in 2009; and he serves as the current chair of the African American Advisory Committee for Tryon Palace, and as a member of the Tryon Palace Foundation.   Dennard is also one of the principal founders of the African and African American Studies Program at ECU and was its first director (2007- 2015).

David C. Dennard specializes in the social and cultural history of the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  He holds a BS. from Fort Valley State College, an M.A. from Atlanta University, and a Ph.D. from Northwestern University.  As former director of the Institute for Historical and Cultural Research, and as a current member of the North Carolina Historical Commission, he has worked extensively with museums and historic sites in North Carolina, and is affiliated with a number of current boards and organizations.  In 2001, Governor Michael Easley appointed Dennard to the Historic Bath Commission; Governor Beverly Perdue appointed him to the NC Historical Commission in 2009; and he serves as the current chair of the African American Advisory Committee for Tryon Palace, and as a member of the Tryon Palace Foundation.   Dennard is also one of the principal founders of the African and African American Studies Program at ECU and was its first director (2007- 2015).

Dennard has published short articles and essays in the St. James Guide to Biography, The Research Guide to American Historical Biography, The Journal of Negro History, The North Carolina Historical Review, The Journal of Southern History, The Florida Historical Quarterly, and The Civil War Book Review.  He served as an advisor and contributor to Richard C. Scheider, ed., African American History in the Press, 1851-1899.  Dennard was also a member of the editorial review board for James L. Leloudis’s, ed., North Carolina (2003), and has served as a manuscript reviewer for both the University Press of Florida and The Journal of the North Carolina Association of Historians.

Dennard’s current research projects include revision of a book-length manuscript on “Black Preachers in the Antebellum South, 1800-1865,” “A Study of African Americans in North Carolina During the American Civil War,” and “A People’s History of Middle Georgia Juke Joints.”

 

Location: 
North Carolina History Center

Event Price

Free
Contact Email: 
info@tryonpalace.org
Contact Phone: 
252-639-3500
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